John Moore

John Moore is an engineer who lives and works in Houston, Texas. His stories have appeared in New Destinies, Realms of Fantasy, Tomorrow SF, Writers of the Future, Marion Zimmer Bradley’s Fantasy Magazine, Aboriginal SF, and other magazines and anthologies.

Bibliography

  • Standalone
    A Fate Worse Than Dragons
    John Moore
  • Standalone
    Bad Prince Charlie
    John Moore
  • Standalone
    The Unhandsome Prince
    John Moore
  • Standalone
    Heroics for Beginners
    John Moore
  • Standalone
    Slay and Rescue
    John Moore
     

Reviews

Standalone

A Fate Worse Than Dragons
“A brisk and well-plotted little adventure that keeps all the charm and humor of his earlier work, but with a more focused and confident approach to the story. The most satisfying John Moore novel yet.”

SF Reviews

“If he hasn’t quite reached the level of L. Sprague de Camp, then at least he’s moving in that direction.”

Critical Mass

“The latest delightful fairy tale parody by John Moore. Wonderful word play, enjoyable characters, and a page turning story all contribute to making this the feel good book of the year.”

Genrefluent

Bad Prince Charlie
“I enjoy John Moore’s fractured fairy tales, so it was a pleasure to find BAD PRINCE CHARLIE in my mail […] it’s even better than its predecessors. The story makes perfectly good sense from the start. Look for it, and enjoy!”

Analog

The Unhandsome Prince
“In this clever twist on the old fairy tale, Moore combines elements of The Frog Prince, Rapunzel and Rumpelstiltskin into a fresh, modern whole.”

RT Book Reviews

“From the wickedly clever, slightly demented mind of Moore comes another fractured fairy tale melodrama […] Full of laughs and ludicrousness, THE UNHANDSOME PRINCE is highly recommended for Mel Brooks and Rocky & Bullwinkle fans.”

Starlog

“A thoroughly scrambled fairy tale that works quite well […] Have fun!”

Analog

“A genuinely funny story of court intrigues and true love, sort of.”

Science Fiction Chronicle

“Moore has a twisted take on fairytale cliches, which makes his work fun, unpredictable and a light-hearted read. The characters may seem like fairytale archetypes but they transcend the genre, coming close to broad winks at the reader without going over the line, even as the story accelerates steadily toward a satisfying (and, naturally, romantic) conclusion.”

SFRevu

“Nobody does fairy tale parody better than Moore and what makes it a joy to read is that it is done with an affectionate tone and a fresh vibrant voice.”

Genre Fluent

Heroics for Beginners
“There’s something here for every fan of comic fantasy. This clever riff on fantasy tropes will find its greatest fans among longtime readers of the genre. This is pure silliness with a good heart, with laugh-out-loud moments and straightforward storytelling.”

RT Book Reviews

“Moore lovingly skewers fantasy conventions, relationships and more with broad, good humor. Those who’ve worn out their copy of The Princess Bride will want to give this book a try.”

Starlog

“A clever idea which Moore exploits quite well. There’s a bucket full of good laughs in this one.”

Science Fiction Chronicle

“Forget Terry Pratchett, Tom Holt, and Robert Rankin. John Moore is far funnier.”

Fantasy Literature

Slay and Rescue
“A glorious romp through fairytale times and places. And, of course, everybody lives happily. Fans of Terry Pratchett’s Discworld will enjoy this.”

Kliatt

“A sidesplitting, rib tickling roller coaster ride of fairy tale parodies laced with hilarious bits connecting fantasy with modern day issues […] a must read for Monty Python fans.”

Alternate Hilarities

“A humorous fantasy, and a charming one at that […] a delicious job […] all in all, good vulgar fun, and a neat job of melding and modernizing.”

Asimov’s SF Magazine

“A clever, zany romp, full of creative one-liners and cheerful anachronisms, with language appropriately overblown for stereotypical effect […] hilarious sustained parody.”

VOYA

“John Moore’s delightful SLAY AND RESCUE stands out from the crowd […] All the main characters work well, and my favorite is Wendell, (Prince) Charming’s pre-pubescent page, who’s more interested in food than in princesses. Moore has a good sense of timing and knows how far he can carry a joke before it becomes tiresome. I laughed throughout SLAY AND RESCUE, and it’s not easy to make me do that these days.”

Aboriginal SF Magazine

Awards & Accolades

Standalone

A Fate Worse Than Dragons
USA

SF Book Club selection

Bad Prince Charlie
USA

#8 Locus Paperback Bestseller List

USA

SF Book Club selection

The Unhandsome Prince
USA

SF Book Club selection

Heroics for Beginners
USA

Locus Bestseller List

USA

SF Book Club selection

Slay and Rescue
USA

SF Book Club selection